Blog Activity

  • Thirty Steps from "Yesterday's Subscription Marketing" to "Today's Customer Convenience"

    Publishing and subscription marketing panel with Jim Fosina, CEO, Fosina Marketing Group; Barry Blumenfield, CEO/Chairman, BMI Fulfillment Services and others.

    With the explosion of the popularity of subscription services "box of the month", and others offering video, music, etc. - companies are developing innovative subscription models and services that answer the consumers wants and needs.

     Learn how to make subscription marketing programs relevant and successful in the current consumer business environment. 

    Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 11:30am
    Networking & Cocktails: 11:30am - 12:20pm
    Luncheon & Presentation: 12:20pm - 2:00pm

    Member Price: 

    $75

    Non-Member Price: 

    $90
  • A Great Time with Good People, Bring a Client or Colleague!

    "Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it a family. Whatever you call it, whoever you are, you need one."

    - Jane Howard

    Here's a chance to come out, network with fellow members of the direct marketing community, and make new connections!

    Join DMCNY friends and colleagues on April 8. The evening kicks off at 6:00 p.m. at Hurley's. See you there!

    Register Today, Then Have a Drink on us!

    Only $25 for Members ($35 for Non-Members) gets you a free drink, plenty of hors d'oeuvres - and, of course, the chance to reacquaint yourself with the tri-state area's premier direct marketers.

    Event Sponsorship: 

    Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 6:00pm
    6:00pm - 9:00pm

    Member Price: 

    $25

    Non-Member Price: 

    $35
  • Bruce Biegel's 2015 Annual Outlook

    Once again we kicked off the New Year at DMCNY with the razor-sharp predictions of Bruce A. Biegel, Senior Managing Director of the Winterberry Group and Petsky Prunier advisor. Biegel made sense of the major forces shaping our industry in 2014 and forecasted their effects in 2015 and beyond.

    If you joined us for the January 9 luncheon, this is a must-download presentation.  For those who weren't able to make the luncheon, get a glimpse of what you missed.

    To download the presentation, the file is attached below.


    Additional coverage "In the News" 

    Target Marketing Magazine (January 12, 2015)
    "Ad Spending Will ‘Be the Highest Ever’ in 2015, Says Biegel

    Direct Marketing News (January 9, 2015) 
    "Where Will Marketing Grow in 2015"
     

     

     

    File attachment: 

    AttachmentSize
    Biegel-2015 Annual Outlook-DMCNY.pdf2.48 MB
  • DMCNY Member News

    Issue: 

    December, 2014

    Big congratulations to Joe Frick of Adrea Rubin Media Inc., who received Datalogix's prestigious 360A partner award for August 2014. Joe Frick, VP of Marketing and Social Media, joef@adrearubin.com, 646-487-3768.
     

    Prompt Direct recently unveiled PromptTRACK Alerts, a customizable mailer notification tool.  As mail is scanned, Prompt lets the mailer know when it reaches a particular point in its journey, for example, when delivery is imminent. Phil Catalano, pcatalano@promptdirect.com.
     

    MeritDirect, the leading provide of global multichannel marketing services, is pleased to announce the opening of a new satellite office in San Joe CA, expanding the company to the West Coast.  The operations in San Jose will be managed by Chris Blohm, Senior Vice President of Data & Media Services, and staffed by Deirdre Blohm, Vice President of Customer Acquisition & Retention.  Contact Chris Blohm at 669-231-4753 or Deirdre Blohm at 660-231-4410.
     

    Fosina Marketing Group celebrates quite the "giving quarter," having signed several new humanitarian non-profit clients, helping them fundraise online via sustaining giving.  The company also assisted their client Amora Coffee with going "Pink" to increase Breast Cancer Awareness.  The Fosina team also got wet and donated to ALS, and took to the links in support of the Hudson Valley Junior Achievement Golf Outling.  Ray Schneeberger, VP Sales, rschneeberger@fosinamarketinggroup.com.  203-546-5547.

     

    Donna Baier Stein, Brian Kurtz, and Bob Bly all spoke at the American Writers and Artists Institute 4-Day Copywriting Bootcamp in DelRay Beach FL in October.  Richard Armstrong gave the keynote address.  Donna Baier Stein, donna@writesontarget.com, 908-872-1775.
     

    The club presented its 2014 Mal Dunn Leadership Award sponsored by Alliant to Bruce Biegel, senior managing director, Winterberry Group, at a special luncheon on Thursday, September 11.  The Mal Dunn Leadership Award recognizes data-driven marketing professionals for their exemplary service to the field.
     

    Leon Henry Inc. is proud to announce their recertification by WBENC (The Women's Business Enterprise National Council) for the 6th year in a row.  Leon Henry Inc. is also certified as a New York State Woman Owned Business Enterprise.  Contact lh@leonhenryinc.com or call 914-285-3456. 

    Author: 

    dmcny

    To help bring our vibrant DM community closer, let us know what you and your company are up to!  Send your news to postings@dmcny.org.  Notices will be placed in the newsletter and online.

  • Bill Baird's picture

    DMCNY September Luncheon Notes - OmniChannel Marketing

    The September presentation by Paradysz and PM Digital’s co-founder and co-CEO Chris Paradysz and VP, Advisory Services Michael McVeigh focused on the growing need for Omnichannel marketing, the related challenges marketers face, and strategies and solutions to meet those challenges.

    The top takeaways were: 

    What is Omnichannel Marketing?  It’s a strategy that builds campaigns and infrastructure from the point of view of the customer.  It fights fragmentation to achieve customer-centric foundations.  And it drives content based on unique customer behaviors and histories. 

    Why is Omnichannel Marketing Necessary? Customers are spending more than double the amount of time per day on mobile devices vs. 4 years ago, as well as doubling the number of consultations prior to purchase.  They rely on more information sources and expect a seamless buying experience across the channels closest to those sources.  Furthermore, your competitors are investing in omnichannel: 83% of marketers said they intended to invest in it in 2014. 

    Who’s Doing it Right?  One example is Skriiiex, a 26-year-old music producer and DJ who produced $16m in revenue in 2013 using a vast portfolio of social media followers, fans, subscribers and downloadable sources.  Another strong example is Macy’s, where the stores are fulfillment centers; sales reps order products for customers on line; and budgets are omnichannel (and not in silo’s). 

    The Challenges.  Challenges include the fear of the strategic overhaul that omnichannel implies.  A transition to omnichannel threatens existing separate digital and offline groups.  And fractured & isolated capabilities contradict findings across the board. 

    The Process.  The key to successfully leveraging data across all touch points is to create a comprehensive view of how customers behave from channel to channel to understand (and optimize) the experience.  

    First understand your audience – what do they care about?  What are their preferences?  Your goal is to understand these customer profiles well enough to develop a marketing recipe strategy that will drive engagement. 

    Then segment your audience and build a contact strategy for each segment. 

    How Do You Know When You Need a Dashboard?  When weekly report attachments take up over 90% of your inbox storage … and amount to more than 90% of your unread messages.  (Or if your existing dashboard can’t pass the “Fortune Cookie Test”: Are you less likely to open your dashboard than a fortune cookie … or do you find its contents less informative?)

    What is an Effective Dashboard?  It scales up to an executive level; drills down to campaign, channel and customer segment; enables you as the user to interact by time period with filters to answer questions as they occur to you; and displays Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) versus goal and budget. 

    Competitive Dashboards.  In an omnichannel environment, things change quickly.  As with your own business, you need to know how effectively your competitors are growing, engaging and retaining customers in each channel.  You need to understand how they’re doing it.  And to determine whether you should emulate what they’re doing.   You should be doing this vigilantly across channels, using competitive dashboards.  

    Multichannel Attribution.  As of November 2013, 18% of marketers were practicing sophisticated cross-channel attribution, which identifies how spending in one channel effects responsiveness in another.  As of September 2013, 2% of marketers used a combined attribution strategy to achieve omnichannel success, and this number is growing rapidly.

  • Getting to Know Anonymous Consumers — What’s Your Strategy?

    Issue: 

    January, 2013

    This is an exciting time, full of amazing opportunities for marketers.

    Given all the change – consumer expectations, technologies, devices, the economy –

    marketers face a monumental task in reaching and grabbing the attention of consumers. Does your brand have a strategy for getting to know, and connect with, consumers individually?

    Identifying Consumers Along the Path to Purchase 

    Each consumer is on his or her own path to purchase. Only in understanding this path can a brand know the next right thing to say, and when and where to say it. 

    A specific challenge facing marketers is the notion of the “anonymous” consumer. Consumers, for the most part, research and shop anonymously and form an independent purchase decision before they step foot into a retail store or log onto a web site. While there is typically a mountain of data about consumers available from many sources, it can’t always be relied upon to be complete or compiled in one place or format. 

    Brand marketers today must be relentless about data collection.  When a brand knows something about a current or potential customer, it can use that insight to influence the purchase when the consumer is in the market. The objective must be to pull together all available data to identify where a consumer is along the path to purchase, and then collect what is missing to form a complete picture. 

    The good news is that consumers will tell you who they are and what they want, as long as you give them a reason to do so.  Here is some advice: 

    • Engaged consumers are more profitable and more loyal than others. Through “engineered engagement” with consumers — while respecting their preferences and asking permission — you can determine the right expression of your brand and product features that appeal to an individual consumer. 
    • Consumers prefer to receive personally relevant information. Conduct meaningful conversations on each consumer’s terms, and then tailor interactions to meet specific needs. 
    • The customer’s journey is longitudinal and not consistent. Just when you think you have it all figured out, the consumer changes. To successfully identify and engage with the consumer today, be willing and able to meet the consumer where they are, and in a relevant and engaging manner. An integrated multichannel program is a necessity to provide a cohesive experience. Consider the behaviors around each channel – from direct mail to social media – and build a plan that leverages multiple touch points and evokes action.
    • Be prepared to modify the engagement process in real time, on the fly, to keep in step with the consumer.

    The changing market is exciting and opening up a world of possibilities. But, one thing remains true: Engaging with consumers one-on-one helps marketers design and deliver a differentiating and impactful customer experience — and that is the strategy that will pay out for both consumer and brand.  

    Author: 

    Michele Fitzpatrick
    Michele Fitzpatrick's picture

    Michele Fitzpatrick is senior vice president, strategy & insight for The Agency Inside Harte-Hanks, and a speaker at the DMCNY September 2012 luncheon. Reach her at Michele_Fitzpatrick@Harte-Hanks.com.

  • Turn Your “Follower” Relationships into Business and Profit

    Issue: 

    January, 2013

    Branding and dialogue are excellent first steps – but they don’t pay the rent.  

    To me, customer acquisition is getting somebody to buy from you for the very first time. Customer retention is getting a person who was bought from you at least one time to buy from you again. 

    Branding is getting your product or service to be a part of the decision set when members of your targeted market segment want to purchase the product or service you sell.

    Today, with an emphasis placed on gaining social media "followers," or being "liked," or in some other way engaging with your online suspects, prospects and customers, we need to understand that these efforts cost money and must be measured in terms of revenue and renewability. 

    Consider the amount of thought and effort put into understanding how you can improve your results from a direct mail campaign by just one or two tenths of a percent. You test offers, formats, headlines, and so many others variables in a structured fashion where you can measure and attribute results to tested variables. Consider how you test different mailing lists, and segments of lists to maximize your results.

    It is important to put the same effort and pay attention to the same details when engaging with your followers and other "fan-based" constituents.

    Closed mouths don’t get fed

    Many businesses today are handling their "followers" with kid gloves. They seem to be hesitant to use time-tested techniques to commercialize relationships.

    It is important to recognize that your "followers" chose to initiate a relationship with your business. So you can consider them real prospects, and many of them may already be your customers. You have the opportunity to grow your relationship with them.

    Ask for the order

    A good place to begin is by segmenting your "followers." First, find your customers by matching transactional data. For everyone you can’t identify, ask them how they perceive of their relationship. You can do this directly with a poll, or a survey, or using more subtle tactics. 

    Some marketers will express concern about alienating people in the delicate world of social media. To me, the reality is people will either want to solidify their relationship with you or they won’t. History dictates some of these people will never buy from you. The ones who truly have an interest in your company, products and services will respond to your efforts. This will empower you with knowledge you can use.

    Now you should be on familiar ground. Now that your “followers” are organized by segment, develop strategies for each segment and work your magic.

    Cultivating your “followers” has significant advantages

    Your cost to develop new customers from these prospects will be lower than a traditional acquisition effort since the names are essentially free, and there is already some basic bonding between you and them, which bodes well for anticipated response rates. 

    For retention, or getting your “following” current customers to buy again, social media represents another touch point where you can make an offer, with the added advantage of enhance customer insight from your interactive dialogue.  This makes me wonder: Should we create a new model called XRFM, where a person’s “expressed interest” might prove more predictive than RFM alone?  

    Once you recognize the value of commercializing relationships with your “followers;” once you realize that a good number of them will be responsive to your efforts; and once you accept the fact that many “followers” are going to never become customers; then you will be able to test the value of marketing to the “follower” segments and calculate whether your branding efforts to attract and engage “followers” are significant to your business.

    Author: 

    Myron Gould
    Myron Gould's picture

    Myron Gould is a Professor of Marketing and Management at New York University, and consults on business planning and strategy development. Reach him at mgould@crmnetwork.com, or on Twitter @nyuprof or @bplanwritercom.

  • Thinking Outside the Box with Content Marketing

    Issue: 

    May, 2013

    I’m a dyed-in-the-wool direct marketer, so this is going to sound like heresy.  I propose to champion an indirect method of marketing and selling, namely content marketing.  You’re probably thinking, “What, no call to action?” or “Where’s the ROI for indirect marketing?”

    But let’s take a close look at content marketing. To an email marketer, content marketing actually makes a lot of sense.  In fact, compelling and engaging content and content-based offers are methods that are very effective in convincing your audience to act.

    So, what is content marketing? 

    Content marketing is the technique of creating, curating and distributing relevant and valuable information to attract, acquire, and engage a clearly defined and well-understood target audience—with the objective of driving profitable customer action.

    If I haven’t grabbed you yet, notice that the definition is all about targeted marketing to drive profitable actions.  That’s not so far afield of direct marketing!

    I’ll address content creation in a moment, but let me first explain content curation.  This aspect of content marketing allows a company to cull ideas available from a myriad of sources, decide on the most important resources, and package the information with the company’s point of view in mind.  As an example, if I wanted to position my company as an expert in direct marketing, I’d research credible sources, select authoritative information and then put my own spin on why direct marketing is valuable.  I would also be careful to credit my sources.

    Why should you care about content marketing?

    Content marketing allows you to reach your target audiences in new and different ways, among them:

    •       Content marketing helps you attract additional audiences, by building trust and credibility. Lots of people don’t want to be hit over the head with a heavy hammer these days.  Traditional marketing communications may not work with this kind of prospect.  

    •       You’ll drive more traffic to your website.  Search engines are increasingly tweaking their algorithms to give sites credit for credible content.

    •       Content marketing addresses your sales funnel in engaging ways, by providing the right message to the right people at the right time.

    How to become an effective content marketer

    Every company has content.  You probably have as blog posts, videos, presentations, photos, webinars, marketing collateral, press releases, industry articles and white papers already in hand. 

    Here are the top ten content marketing vehicles.  I’ll bet you are already using at least half of these already.  Consider testing even more.

    1.       Social media—a great way to get your content shared and to get your audience engaged.

    2.       E-newsletters—a perfect vehicle to build and deepen relationships with those who want to hear from you.

    3.       Articles on your website.  Well-written articles let you address issues, trends and topics of interest to targeted audiences.

    4.       Press releases and clips.   Today, your audience of influencers is no longer just journalists. You need to be cultivating anyone online who accesses search engines, RSS feeds or social media for information on a topic of interest.

    5.       Blog posts.  A blog offers an easy way to present short chunks of frequently refreshed web content.

    6.       Videos.  Video is hot!  Possibly the most powerful vehicle for engaging customers and prospects. 

    7.       Print magazines and catalogs.  Direct marketers have been in the business of providing content for years.

    8.       Infographics—which present complex information quickly and clearly.  A perfect opportunity for content curation.

    9.       White papers.  Used primarily by B-to-B marketers, white papers deliver thought leadership on a topic of interest.  They can also present research, provide product usage tips, or highlight a particular product or service.

    10.   Webinars, webcasts and podcasts—which give marketers the opportunity to capture attention and present products and services.  When archived, their influence grows with time. 

    I am going to assume you do have content already available in your company.  Now it’s time to re-purpose or re-package your content for a minimum of three marketing channels.  Content marketing is about leveraging information so that your audience may find you on social media, on your site, from search engines or via links from external sites.  So take up the challenge.  This stuff is really direct marketing!

    Author: 

    Reggie Brady
    Reggie Brady's picture

    Reggie Brady is president of Reggie Brady Marketing Solutions, a direct and email marketing consultancy.  Reach her at 203-838-8138 or reggie@reggiebrady.com

  • A Case for Analog in a Digital World

    Issue: 

    June, 2012

    True, the world has gone digital. But that doesn’t mean customers no longer want to hold a catalog in their hands!  Here’s another compelling argument for integration; specifically, keeping print, and tried-and-true DM techniques, a part of your marketing mix.

    I believe that most direct marketers will find the following to be a reasonable modern definition of our profession: Direct marketing is “the monetization of data in a privacy- compliant manner.”  My argument for the continued use of analog direct marketing techniques follows from this premise.  (It’s still the data, stupid!)

    I grew up in an analog world.  I remember shared telephone “party lines” and black-and-white TV.  As a direct marketer, I remember an era before PCs, when a mail order was really an order placed though the mail.  

    Today, most of the articles in print and online are about the importance of having a “social media strategy.”  That is the world of direct marketing in the 2nd decade of the 21st century.

    But I will argue that direct marketers who ignore print and the tried-and-true techniques like recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) analyses are leaving money on the table.  Consumers who buy direct have shifted how they buy (more online and less by phone or mail), but not what they buy.  And they still want to have a trusted relationship with companies and buy products and services that are relevant to their own unique lives.

    Print and RFM still work

    Direct marketing has always been about monetizing data by targeting customer preferences.  RFM still works – digitally and in print.  Case in point: I mailed a small catalog, with an equally small circulation (30,000) this past fall.  The response rate was off the charts.  And the results were as predicted by our RFM analysis: The most dollars came in from the most recent buyers, followed by the multi-buyers and finally customers with the largest prior purchases.  The catalog, with fully loaded costs, generated a

    handsome profit.  True, more customers ordered online than in the prior year, but I am certain that, without ensuring those customers had a catalog in-hand, the total profit would have been less. 

    Why?  The slim-jim sized book, with a compelling cover, got the attention of a ready buyer increasingly deluged with online offers.  The catalog stood out from the crowd as something concrete the customer could hold in his or her hand.

    For that reason, I am of the opinion that adding mail offers to your marketing mix can actually get your products or services more attention these days.

    Should you add print to your mix?  Test it and see.

    Should every direct marketer be in print today?  Probably not; however, I would argue that most should – and you will never know whether you should mail until you simply test it.

    And that doesn’t have to cost you too much.  Printers are creating more ways to make ink-on-paper competitive with other ways to reach customers.  Co-mailing alone has made it possible to put more catalogs in the mail profitably.

    Finally, here’s a strong argument for testing a print run: Even Amazon and Google – who are no-doubt the most successful of the pure-play digital marketers – are testing print.

    Multi-channel becomes omnichannel

    The most successful direct marketers understand that you must meet your current and prospective customers where they are.  And there are customers who still prefer to view products and services in print, even if their preferred ordering vehicle is online.  There are buyers who would prefer to speak with a live, knowledgeable customer service representative before placing an order, and finally, there are still people who will send in a mail order.  We must not ignore these individual preferences!

    I am a big champion of social media, and agree that direct marketers who ignore that important vehicle do so at their peril.  However, I’m also convinced that ignoring traditional direct marketing practices will result in lost profits.

    Consider expanding your multichannel marketing to embrace some tried-and-true direct mail practices.  The results could surprise you – in a very good way. 

    Author: 

    Robert Allen
    Robert Allen's picture

    Bob Allen is President/CEO of the WindhamFoundation (www.windham-foundation.org),based in Grafton, Vermont.  The foundation has two operating businesses: The Grafton Inn and The Grafton Village Cheese Company.   Bob retired in 2005 after 25 years at The Vermont Country Store.  In 2010, he served as Interim CEO of the Direct Marketing Association in New York.  Reach him at bob.allen@windham-foundation.org.

  • Canadian Law Calls for Opt-in for Email

    Issue: 

    June, 2012

    The challenges to integrated marketing continue.  The new Canadian anti-spam law could hold dire consequences for unsuspecting American marketers.  Here’s a breakdown of what the law prohibits, and what it could mean to you if there are Canadian names on your email list.

    In 2010, Canada adopted an anti-spam law called The Fighting Internet and Wireless Spam Act (FISA).  The relevant regulator (CRTC) recently published its final regulations, which provide details on the required contact information and unsubscribe mechanism to be included in each commercial electronic message, and the requirements for valid consent.  The law will be effective at a date to be set by the Governor in Counsel.

    What this means for marketers

    It is wise for marketers to assume the law is effective now since a “phase-in”period of three years ran from adoption, and there are compliance steps that one should take right away.

    Here’s an important point to remember: The statute covers the “sending” of messages.  It is irrelevant whether the message gets delivered or whether the address even exists.  It is the transmission alone that will be deemed illicit.

    And a caveat: You can still use a Canadian email address without “expressed consent” until the law’s effective date, provided it is not merely a rented name but arises from an “existing business relationship” or an “existing non-business relationship.”

    “Expressed”Consent

    Under the law, a commercial emailer must obtain the “expressed” consent of the recipient before sending commercial emails or other electronic messages, unless there is an “existing business relationship” or “an existing non-business relationship.”  For addresses on file on the effective date who have not objected and with whom you have a relationship, there is assumed “implied consent” to commercial messages for two years from the establishment of that relationship.

    A “business” relationship

    What is a “business relationship”under the law is basically a matter of common sense.  The statute defines the relationship in terms of actions or messages relating to actions.  Generally, if it feels like business, it’s a business relationship.  A business relationship includes enquiries also, but only for a duration of six months per each relationship.

    The “non-business relationship” is similarly a matter of common sense.  The non-business relationship might have involved a donation or a charitable gift made within the previous two years, such as to a political party, charity or a candidate for public office.

    Exceptions

    Some exceptions to the law exist for marketers.  They include:

    • Responding to a request for a quote
    • Employment-related matters  
    • Information regarding a subscription, membership, or maintenance arrangement of the addressee
    • Information regarding delivery of a product or service previously ordered

    Personal messages are also exempt. 

    Sender information and unsubscribe options

    Disclosure is required of the name and contact information of the sending company, and the company on whose behalf it is being sent.  There must be an easy means to object, ie,“readily contact” the sender for 60 days from transmission.  A phone number or an email unsubscribe mechanism should be acceptable to meet this requirement.

    There must also be an unsubscribe mechanism in the email.  This can be a link to a website or an email reply mechanism or “any other electronic means that will enable the person to indicate the wish.”  The industry in Canada believes a phone number would be acceptable as well.

    Painted with a broad brush

    Be forewarned that the statute is not just about email spam, but any “commercial electronic message,” and any message via telecommunication, landline or mobile, such as text, sound, voice, image, IM, or “any similar account.”  Presumably, that would include social media venues as well.

    Dire consequences

    Noncompliance with this law can bring dire consequences. The law has penalties of up to $1 million for individuals and $10 million for businesses. The fines are “per violation,”and there are grounds to believe

    that a campaign mailed over a multi-day period would draw a penalty for each day.  Thus a three-day campaign might cost a company $30 million.

    Be forewarned that there is also a private “right of action” for any individual or business that has been affected by a violation.  Take heed: Corporate officers and directors can be held personally liable for violations.

    Industry sources believe that these penalties were intended for the worst spammers, but the courts will ultimately decide who that is.  Of course, if you have no physical presence in Canada, it may be that any

    lawsuit against you in Canada would not be sustainable.  It is doubtful that you could be sued in a US court under the Canadian law. 

    However, it is unclear whether a “penalty” assessed against your company in Canada might not receive enforcement by a US court.  It’s best to play it safe.

    Any US company with a database of addresses obtained without affirmative consent, such as rented lists or gathered addresses, should consider determining the physical locations of those addresses – and obtain consent from Canadian residents.  Obviously, “.ca” domains are Canadian, but the national location of addresses with gmail or domains like “.int,” “.post,” “.co” – the list goes on – could be anywhere.  Protect yourself. 

    Author: 

    Charles Prescott
    Charles Prescott's picture

    Charles Prescott is a consultant and attorney specializing in marketing, privacy and international postal matters.  He primarily represents companies seeking to enter new country markets.  Previously with the US DMA as VP, international business development, he isnow on its board of directors.  Reach him at +1.914.533.0208 or chaspres@optonline.net.

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